Posts Tagged ‘nominations’

Voting for the Human Rights Tulip 2017now open

August 31, 2017

You can vote for your favourite candidate to win this Dutch government award for worldwide innovative human rights defenders. Have a look at the 10 nominees below.

Justice and Peace NL has been chosen by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to facilitate the selection process of the Human Rights Tulip award. The Human Rights Tulip is an annual award presented by the Dutch government to individuals and organisations who take an innovate approach to promoting human rights. The ten nominees are: Ali Idrissa (Niger), Angélica Choc (Guatemala), Azza Soliman (Egypt), Cordelia Foundation (Hungary), Dina Meza (Honduras), Gisha (Israel/Palestinian Territories), Graciela Pérez Rodriguez (Mexico), Lottie Cunningham Wren (Nicaragua), Mirza Shahzad Akbar (Pakistan) and Wang Quanzhang (China). The minister will pick the winner from the top 3 candidates who have gathered the most votes. 
On Friday December 8 the minister will award the winner the bronze Human Rights Tulip statue and a prize worth € 100.000,-. The winner can use the funding to further develop his or her innovative contribution to strengthening human rights – and on such a scale that as many people and places benefit as possible.

For last year’s winner: https://humanrightsdefenders.blog/2016/11/06/pakistani-digital-activist-nighat-dad-recipient-of-2016-human-rights-tulip/

The nomination round yielded almost 130 nominations. These 130 were assessed by Justice and Peace, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and their networks. 10 candidates were selected for the online voting. Public voting opened on Monday August 28 at 12.00 and will close on Wednesday September 6 at 24.00 (Dutch time).

Below you can view the profiles of the 10 candidates:

Read the rest of this entry »

Front Line reminder of deadline for its 2017 award

January 16, 2017

Front Line Defenders issued a second call for nominations for the 2017 Front Line Defenders Award for Human Rights Defenders at Risk (if you have already submitted a nomination you should have received a confirmation email). Deadline remains:  Friday, 3 February 2017.  Seehttps://humanrightsdefenders.blog/2016/12/14/call-for-nominations-for-two-important-human-rights-awards-deadline-february-2017/Frontline NEWlogo-2 full version - cropped

European Parliament’s Sakharov Prize 2016: nominees announced

September 16, 2016

The European Parliament awards the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought every year to honor individuals and organisations defending human rights and fundamental freedoms. Nominations for the Sakharov Prize are made by political groups or by at least 40 MEPs. The 4 nominees for this year’s Sakharov Prize are:

Can Dündar, the former editor-in-chief of Turkish daily Cumhuriyet, was arrested last November after his newspaper reported on Turkey’s intelligence service smuggling arms to rebels in Syria. He was later sentenced to five years and 10 months in prison for “revealing state secrets”, survived an assassination attempt and now lives in exile. He was nominated by Greens/EFA, EFDD and GUE/NGL.

Mustafa Dzhemilev, former chair of Mejlis of the Crimean Tatars People (Tatar parliament), a former Soviet dissident and a Ukrainian MP, has been standing up for human and minority rights for more than half a century. He was six months old when he and his family were deported to central Asia along with all other Crimean Tatars and was only able to come back 45 years later. Now, after Russia annexed Crimea, the human rights activist is again barred from entering the peninsula. He was nominated by EPP and ECR.

Nadia Murad Basee and Lamiya Aji Bashar are advocates for the Yazidi community and for women surviving sexual enslavement by Islamic State. They are both from Kocho, one of the villages near Sinjar, Iraq, which was taken over  by Islamic State in the summer of 2014, and are among the thousands of Yazidi girls and women abducted by Islamic State militants and forced into sex slavery. Murad is also a promoter for recognition of the Yazidi genocide. They were nominated by S&D. Murad Basee was also nominated separately by ALDE.

Ilam Totti, a peaceful advocate of China‘s Uyghur minority,  is serving a life sentence in prison. He was convicted on charges of “separatism” for co-founding the website Uyghur Online, designed to promote understanding between Uyghurs and Han Chinese. He was nominated by MEP Ilhan Kyuchyuk and 42 other MEPs. Ilam Totti – also spelled as Ilham Totti – was announced on 27 April as one of the Final Nominees of the MEA [https://thoolen.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/breaking-news-final-nominees-2016-martin-ennals-award-tohti-zone-9-bloggers-razan-zaitouneh-annoucement/]

The vote for the shortlist of three finalists will be held during a joint meeting of the foreign affairs and development committee. The Conference of Presidents, made up of the Parliament President and the political group leaders, will announce the winner(s) of the 2016 Sakharov Prize on 27 October.

For more on the Sakharov award: https://thoolen.wordpress.com/tag/sakharov-prize/

Source: Sakharov Prize 2016: nominees revealed | News | European Parliament

Public voting for the 2016 Human Rights Tulip has started

August 30, 2016

Public voting for the Dutch human rights award, The Tulip, has opened on 29 August 2016 and lasts until 7 September. Anyone can vote for their favourite nominee at www.humanrightstulip.nl or www.mensenrechtentulp.nl.

Human Rights Tulip

Human Rights Tulip Photo: Aad Meijer/Newsroom BZ

The Human Rights Tulip is an award for innovative human rights defenders. It is intended to support human rights defenders and organisations, publicise their efforts and inspire others. The 10 nominees are:

Mwatana Organization For Human Rights (Yemen),

Mr Pierre Claver Mbonimpa (Burundi),

Ms Nighat Dad (Pakistan),

the El Nadim Center (Egypt),

Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres (Mexico),

the native community of Santa Clara de Uchunya (Peru),

Centro Prodh (Mexico),

Mr Nguyn Quang A (Vietnam),

Ms Nahid Gabralla (Sudan) and

the Lebanese Association for Democratic Elections (LADE) (Lebanon).

Out of the top 3 nominees chosen by public vote, foreign minister Bert Koenders will select the winner, whom he will present with the award – a bronze tulip-shaped statue – on International Human Rights Day, 10 December.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Justice and Peace Foundation in The Hague together selected the nominees and provide support for the winning individual or organization. The winner receives €100,000 in prize money, enabling them to expand the reach of the work and allow as many people as possible around the world to benefit from the award.

In 2015 the Human Rights Tulip was awarded to IRA Mauritania (Initiative for the Resurgence of the Abolitionist Movement in Mauritania).  https://thoolen.wordpress.com/2015/12/12/2015-human-rights-tulip-awarded-to-ira-mauritania/

Source: The 2016 Human Rights Tulip: public voting starts today | News item | Government.nl

Nominations for Human Rights Tulip open as from today

June 15, 2015

Nominations for the 2015 Human Rights Tulip award for human rights defenders are now, Monday 15 June, welcome. For more information on this award see: http://www.brandsaviors.com/thedigest/award/tulip-award.

Deadline for nominations 16 July, to  tulip@hivos.org which is hosting the logistic secretariat.

There is a short video on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cD3KD-jniuM  can help encourage people to nominate.

Please see also: Home | Human Rights Tulip.

 

More on the Sakharov Prize and the Arab nominees

October 16, 2014

A few days ago I published a piece about the little ceremonial dropping of Arab nominees for the European Parliament’s Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought [https://thoolen.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/europes-sakharov-prize-in-trouble-with-regard-to-arab-nominees/]. The main actor in this story – Alaa Abdel Fattah – has given his own views in a piece  in Jadaliyya on 7 October, entitled “On the Sakharov Prize”. To do justice I copy it in its entirety below:

[Sculpture of Soviet nuclear physicist and human rights activist Dr. Andrei Dmitievich Sakharov. Photo by David via Flickr.]
[Sculpture of Soviet nuclear physicist and human rights activist Sakharov. Photo by David via Flickr.]

It was with joy that I received the news of my nomination for the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, the same joy any act of solidarity inspires.

Since my release from prison in Egypt on bail, with my fate still bound to the Special Terrorism Courts and the draconian Protest Law, I have been facing constant harassment from official and unofficial representatives of the regime. New trumped-up criminal charges pop up every few days. A horde of political talk show hosts on supposedly independent TV stations discusses old and out-of-context tweets, twisting my words and assigning sinister implications to them. There is an insistent tarnish campaign meant to prepare the general public for my eventual return to prison. Needless to say, I am banned from appearing on local TV stations, and I am forbidden to travel outside Egypt.

So it is solidarity such as that of European United Left/Nordic Green Left (GUE/NGL) that creates the pressure to keep me out of jail and out of harm. It was also a comfort to find comrades in unexpected places; GUE/NGL’s stance against neoliberal policies and against the distortion of European democracy seemed in line with the aspirations of persecuted revolutionaries in Egypt and the broader Arab context.

I was proud to be nominated along with Tunisian rapper, Ala Yaacoubi, and Moroccan rapper, Mouad Belghouate, both imprisoned for insulting the police in their popular songs. I was relieved that the European Parliament members (MEP) who nominated us understood the point of doing symbolic/verbal violence to the image of the powerful who consistently commit systemic actual violence to the bodies, souls and livelihood of the powerless; relieved that the MEPs understood the meaning of questioning the humanity of those who derive their power from dehumanizing their opponents.

I was not surprised when a new tarnish campaign was launched in reaction against my nomination. My family has faced such campaigns before by supporters of the Israeli occupation and Israeli apartheid. The latest when my sister, Mona Seif, was shortlisted for the Martin Ennals Award. But I was surprised when the president of the GUE/NGL decided to withdraw my nomination based on a two-year-old tweet taken out of context. And I was surprised that this was done without an attempt to contact me for clarification, and without any regard for how such public condemnation affects my safety and liberty. The president of the GUE/NGL has now sent a clear message to the Egyptian authorities that whatever international solidarity and support I have is fragile—easily destroyed with a tweet.

The GUE/NGL are of course free to form their opinion based on whatever sources of information they choose—including well-known neocons writing for the Wall Street Journal about an out-of-context tweet. However, since they made the nomination and made it publicly, it was their responsibility to ascertain how the manner of retreating from it would affect my safety. Other options were available to them; they could have asked me to withdraw, or they could have quietly dropped my name from the short-list.

The GUE/NGL’s president’s statement claims that I “called for the murder of a critical number of Israelis.” For what it is worth, here is what I would have said if anyone from GUE/NGL or any other MEPs had asked me to clarify.

The tweet in question is certainly shocking if taken out of context, but even then it cannot be framed as “a call” for anything. It was a “mention” to two friends, part of a private conversation—a thread spanning multiple tweets—that took place over a public medium (limited to 140 characters) on the first night of Israel’s 2012 attack on Gaza. A conversation between friends who already knew enough about each others’ views to make it unnecessary to clarify and elaborate, for instance, the distinction between civilians and combatants—as one would if one were making a public statement. As this was not a public statement, only those who follow all three of us on Twitter would have had this tweet appear on their timeline at two a.m. on 15 November 2012. And even after the tarnish campaign, it has only been retweeted four times.

To pretend that you can interpret this tweet two years later without consulting the people involved in the conversation, and to claim that it constitutes a call to action, is simply ridiculous. That I should now feel the need to explain and clarify what was not intended for a general public in the first place, and to be condemned for my thoughts, not my actions, in such a manner is clearly an attack on my personal liberty. The chilling effect of having to adapt to such harassment and condemnation should be perfectly clear for those honoring Andrei Sakharov’s legacy.

The conversation relating to the war on Gaza started with a friend expressing her doubt that the conflict would ever be resolved by local actors. The other friend in the conversation and I replied, insisting that like most such conflicts, it would be resolved locally. The tweet stated what seems to be the basic strategy of most national liberation movements, especially those that opt for armed resistance: To make the price of occupation/colonization/apartheid too expensive for the society that supports it. The strategy of the Palestinians is exactly that—via both violent and nonviolent means (boycott, divestments and sanctions, and armed resistance, for example). Since this was during a time of war, I had armed resistance in mind. Think of Vietnam or Algeria; many would say this is exactly what happened: After a critical number of casualties in asymmetric wars, the civilian population supporting the occupier refused to continue its support—despite the fact that the casualties suffered by the society resisting colonization were massively higher.

My tweet was not a call for anything; it was not even a statement of opinion. It was a statement of one of the facts of the conflict. If GUE/NGL had asked me about my views I would have directed them to my March 2012 debate on Deutsche Welle.

It should perhaps be remembered that the first laureate of the Sakharov Prize was Nelson Mandela back in 1988, when he and the African National Congress (ANC) were considered terrorists by many democratic governments. At the time, his views on the necessity of violence for resisting apartheid must have required and inspired complex debates on appropriate tactics and strategies, the rules of engagement, the moral, political and social limitations that should be put on revolutionary violence, etc. There would have been plenty of statements attributable to him or his comrades—including the famous Rivonia Trial speech in which he admits to planning sabotage—that would have looked pretty scary out of context.

Finally, I hardly ever call for any solution or action on my own. As an individual, I have always expressed my opinions and positions in the clearest and strongest language. But as an activist, I have always worked for any given cause with and through the largest united front possible. When it comes to calls for solutions or actions, and for the sake of consensus, I would make the very compromises I refuse to make when speaking only for myself.

More importantly, I do not call for anything when it is not a cause that I am directly engaged with. I stand in solidarity with the Palestinian people, but I never presume to tell them what to do.

If my views on violence—specifically against civilians—are what is in question, the answers can be found in my actions and my published views in my local context and my own struggle in Egypt.

 [This piece is co-published with Mada Masr]

On the Sakharov Prize.

Nominations for the 2015 Sergio Vieira de Mello Award open

September 24, 2014

The Sergio Vieira de Mello Foundation was created in 2007 by family and friends of Sergio Vieira de Mello, the former High Commissioner for Human Rights. One of the aims of the Foundation is to award an Annual Prize in Sergio’s name once a year to individuals, institutions or communities in recognition of outstanding and unique work for peaceful reconciliation.

Criteria for Selecting Candidates include:

  • The candidates are authentic verifiable community-based entities operating in areas of conflict and as such could be refugees, internally displaced persons or persons affected by conflict.
  •  Achievements for which candidates are selected are innovative and unique, and affect the lives and well-being of a substantive segment of the community positively.
  •  A high probability that the initiative can be sustained and replicated in similar communities elsewhere.
  •  Reconciliation and Co-existence resulting from the initiative is measurable, verifiable and sustainable.

Deadline 30 November, 2014, either by e-mail at: info@sergiovdmfoundation.org or by post at: Sergio Vieira de Mello Foundation: 29, Rue des Allobroges, 1227 Carouge, Geneva, Switzerland.  The selection is made by an independent Jury of the Foundation. A form on the website (http://www.sergiovdmfoundation.org/award/) will facilitate the nomination process.

see also: https://thoolen.wordpress.com/tag/sergio-vieira-de-mello/ and for awards: http://www.trueheroesfilms.org/thedigest/awards

Call for nominations for the 2014 Frontline Award until 14 January

January 8, 2014

The annual Front Line Defenders Award was established in 2005 to honour the work of a human rights defender who, through non-violent work, is making an outstanding contribution to the promotion and protection of the Frontline NEWlogos-1 condensed version - croppedhuman rights of others, often at personal risk to themselves. A cash prize of €15,000 is awarded to the laureate and his/her organisation. Deadline: 24 January 2014
Further information and the online nomination form: http://www.frontlinedefenders.org/front-line-award-human-rights-defenders-risk

NOMINATIONS MARTIN ENNALS AWARD 2014 UNTIL 9 DECEMBER

October 22, 2013

Nominations for the  2014 MARTIN ENNALS AWARD FOR HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS (MEA) can now be submitted electronically at  http://www.martinennalsaward.orgDeadline: 9 December 2013.new MEA_logo with text

The Award is granted annually to an individual, or exceptionally an organisation, in recognition of their commitment and ongoing efforts in the defence and promotion of human rights. Nominees must be currently involved in work for the promotion and protection of human rights. Special account is taken of those who are at risk and have demonstrated an active record of combating human rights violations by courageous and innovative means. The MEA aims to encourage individuals or organisations, particularly those who are working in conditions hostile to fundamental human rights and who are in need of protection.

The present value of the annual Award is 20’000 Swiss Francs, to be used for further work in the field of human rights. The following organisations participate in the Jury that selects the award: Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Front Line, Human Rights First, International Federation for Human Rights, the World Organisation Against Torture, International Commission of Jurists, International Service for Human Rights, Protestant Agency for Diakonia and Development  (Germany) and HURIDOCS.

The Ceremony is hosted by the City of Geneva in late 2013. They provide each of the final three nominees with project funds of 11’650 CHF and a 5’000 CHF travel grant.

                                               

 

Call for Nominations for the Robert Kennedy Human Rights Award

January 25, 2013

English: Photo by R. W. Rynerson, May 1968. Ro...

1968 Robert  Kennedy  (credit: Wikipedia)

After the call for nominations for the Nansen Award and Lawyers for Lawyers Award this week, here comes the one for the US-based Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award. Founded in 1968, the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice & Human Rights (RFK Center) has honored 44 human rights defenders working in 26 countries since 1984. The Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award Laureates are individuals who stand up to oppression at grave personal risk in the non-violent pursuit of human rights. The Award recognizes the work of outstanding individuals and provides support for the work of the Laureate through litigation; public awareness campaigns; advocacy to governments, the United Nations, regional bodies, other international entities and non-governmental organizations; and by generating domestic and international support for their cause.

The public is allowed to nominate outstanding human rights defenders.  The deadline is March 1, 2013. Only nominations in English are accepted. Click here for the nominations form:

https://rfkcenter-hra.myreviewroom.com/