Posts Tagged ‘animation’

‘Lost Childhoods’ – an interactive graphic novel exposing child abuse in Nigeria – awarded at BAFTA

June 20, 2019

Journalist-photographer Marc Ellison receiving the award in London on Monday evening [One Media World]
Journalist-photographer Marc Ellison receiving the award in London on Monday evening [One Media World]

The winning entry – Lost Childhoods: How Nigeria’s Fear of Child ‘Witchcraft’ Ruins Young Lives – was praised on Monday for its interactive investigation into the practice of branding children and young adolescents as “witches”. “Combining graphic novel imagery with film, this highly accessible piece effectively covers a major human rights issue,” One World Media organisers said from the awards gala at London’s British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA).

Blamed for family illness, sudden financial loss or other misfortunes, the children are often beaten, locked into cages, branded with hot knives or made to undergo costly “exorcisms” performed by so-called “prophets” in local churches. With little choice but to flee, many children end up as drug addicts and living in rubbish dumps or on the streets.

AJLabs teamed up with journalist-photographer Marc Ellison and Nigerian illustrator Samuel Iwunze to unearth the facts of this under-reported story. Working meticulously with local fixers, NGOs and child psychologists, Ellison was able to expose the practice that has taken hold in parts of the Niger Delta and that has partially been fuelled by myths propagated by the Nigerian film industry.

Lost Childhoods employs a mix of visual and textual formats, including comic/graphic novel illustrations to preserve anonymity and portray past events. Carlos Van Meek, Al Jazeera’s director of Digital Innovation and Programming, said, “This story, in particular, is a skilful weave of investigations, videos, photos and illustrations that brings to light disturbing physical, emotional and religious abuse against children. Our goal is – and always will be – to make an impact that leads to positive change at the local and international level.”

As further testament to the production, AJLabs worked with NGOs to translate the graphic novel into local languages for distribution within communities, schools and churches in Nigeria, in an attempt to educate people and end the practice of scapegoating innocent children and branding them as witches.

Nigeria witchcraft

Short artistic animation give feel of what is means to be without a Fair Trial

November 30, 2016

Fair Trials, a human rights organisation, has created a new animation showing what it would feel like to live in a world without fair trials. To accompany the animation, Fair Trials have set up a website: www.withoutfairtrials.org, which explains why fair trial rights are important, what they mean and the consequences if they are not respected. For example, the right to a fair trial encompasses the right to access a lawyer, the right to be presumed innocent until proved guilty if accused of a criminal offence and the right to be told the case against you in a language you understand.

The right applies whenever there is a determination of someone’s civil rights and obligations or any criminal charge against them. The animation looks at the importance of the right to a fair trial from the police station, to the courtroom and in prison. The animation highlights that around the world, fair trial rights are being denied to many people, everyday. For example, the website accompanying the animation says that in China, imprisoned human rights defenders are being denied access to lawyers and in Spain it is common for suspects not to be given information about the case against them until shortly before the trial starts.

Nyan Kyal Sayn brings his animator talent to the human rights of women in Myanmar

November 14, 2016

Animation in Myanmar goes back to about 1920, earlier than in any other Southeast Asian country. The art form did not prosper under the military regime, but it’s on its way back. One of its most popular exponents has been the well-known cartoonist Aw Pi Kyal. Now his son, Naing Kaung Nyan, 22 – known in the trade as Nyan Kyal Say – has produced a prize-winning work of his own. “My Life I Don’t Want” has won 15 international awards from Myanmar, the United Kingdom, Romania, Barcelona, India, Italy, Ireland, the Netherlands and the United States. Based on actual events, it’s about a young Myanmar woman, and promotes awareness of the rights of women and children.

I describe the difficulties she faces, in terms of poverty, poor education, insecurity, sexual abuse, unwanted pregnancy and human trafficking that afflict so many young women,” said Nyal Kyal Say, who works in medicine as a house surgeon when he’s not creating animations. “I hope to draw attention to women’s rights, get support from foreign organisations and penetrate the Myanmar animation market.

The 12-minute short, produced in May, took eight months to make, including story development, production, financial support, and sound. It was first screened at the 2016 Human Rights Film Festival and went on to compete internationally. At the prestigious Amsterdam Animation Festival 2016 “My Life I Don’t Want” won Best Animated Short in the Emerging Animation Nation category last month, its 12th international award.

“Two of my animations are about human rights, but the environment is also important. If we don’t maintain the environment, there will be no humans to claim their rights. Then there’s health. I graduated from the University of Medicine and I want to create health edutainment animations that deal entertainingly with questions of health. Most residents of rural areas lack health knowledge and can’t find out because of the language barrier,” he said. “To help them overcome all these problems, I want to produce animations that are easy for everyone to understand.”

For my other posts on animation https://thoolen.wordpress.com/tag/animation/

Source: Award-winning animator joins the fight for women’s rights

Cameroon: killing and disappearances by government forces in graphic video

September 7, 2016

This animation – published by AI on 5 September 2016 – was produced based on testimonies collected by Amnesty International by interviewing over 35 direct eyewitnesses and a senior military source. All the sources confirmed that at least 200 men and boys were arrested on 27 December 2014 in the villages of Magdeme and Doublé in Cameroon. In the same operation conducted jointly by the army, the police and the gendarmerie, at least 8 people, including a child, were killed, over 70 buildings were burnt down and many possessions were stolen or destroyed.

The fate of most of those arrested in these two villages remains unknown. At least 25 of these men and boys – perhaps more – died in custody during the night of their arrest in a makeshift cell, while 45 others were taken and registered in Maroua’s prison the following day. At least 130 people, therefore, remain unaccounted for, presumed to be victims of enforced disappearance, with some evidence suggesting more may have died while in the custody of the security forces.

You can sign the petition to the Cameroonian authorities here: http://bit.ly/2cbpF7v

Video: Africartoons Studio; Music: Kalakuta Music Group

for other posts on Cameroon: https://thoolen.wordpress.com/tag/cameroon/

AI animation to galvanise support for human rights defenders

April 15, 2014

We have a tendency to take for granted that there is a worldwide human rights movement to support all the actions and campaigns in favor of human rights defenders. But, this movement needs to be created and galvanised. One tool is the use of animated images with a simple message: that a loud voice can save lives. The example above (animated by Cesare Davolio) is a “commercial’ commissioned by Amnesty Netherlands for the “Use your power” campaign, explaining what the Amnesty urgent action network can accomplish. This short film – published on You Tube on 8 April – explains how the Urgent Action Network works, from receiving news of a human rights defender being arrested to news being sent out to AI activists and members all over the world via text messages (SMS), email etc to individuals taking action. Shows how effective these individual acts can be when coördinated to produce a ‘louder voice’.

 

 

Third and final clip in animated series on human rights system

December 11, 2012

This is third and last chapter in the series of animated videos to which I referred earlier. This is the chapter dealing with collective rights and the issue of enforcement. Unfortunately I see a major error with regard to the latter as the clip does not make clear that the Treaty Bodies complaint procedures are only open to those who reside in countries that have (1) ratified the treaty in question (b) recognised the right of individual complaint. For everybody there are the co-called ‘charter-based’ procedures (mechanisms) which are even less legally binding. These together constitute the global level of complaint procedures, against which one can then place the regional systems.

For the rest a solid and neutral explanation of the history and cohesion of the international system.

Animated Introduction to Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (and NGOs) now out

November 23, 2012

This is the second part of the series “Focus Human Rights” that I referred to in an earlier post. It deals with the second dimension of the Human Rights system: The Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Additionally, it explains women’s rights and shows how NGOs in the Human Rights sector work. Especially the latter part seems somewhat forced into this second volume as they operate in both areas to say the least. It has also a rather strange reference to the International Society for Human Rights which is listed with AI, HRW and HRF as an example of well-known NGOs, while it is in fact fairly small and – outside Germany – without much influence.

The clips are done by Jan Künzl and Jörn Barkemeyer, who welcome comments.

More information about the project:
http://www.edeos.org/en/projects.html

Stay in touch at:
http://www.facebook.com/edeos.org

 

 

Simple but effective video on human rights by Edeos: part 1 out in several languages

November 2, 2012

A small Berlin based NGO has brought out a 8 mn video that is very basic but also very clear. I think it could be especially useful for educators in at the secondary school level or as introduction for a basic class in human rights. The first part (focusing on history and civil and political rights) exists in several languages. I am interested to see what they come up with when dealing with social and economic rights and collective rights.

OOPS there was a link to alternative energy – also important but not what I meant: better go to edeos animated video on human rights part 1 in YOU TUBE 

iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”http://www.youtube.com/embed/3L4r47WiqMw&#8221; frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe

animated videos on human rights from the UN

December 8, 2011

The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, through its Civil Society Section, has made available  a new series of animated videos.

What is a human right? – http://goo.gl/ewPHP

What is the Human Rights Council? – http://goo.gl/Q6u6x

What is a human rights treaty body? – http://goo.gl/5qmti

On the eve of Human Rights Day, they may come in handy especially for those who plan public events of an educational nature.

United Nations Human Rights Council logo.

Image via Wikipedia