Posts Tagged ‘on-line dialogue’

WEBINAR addressing mental health support for human rights defenders

September 20, 2019

Recent research has shown that many human rights defenders are suffering PTSD, depression, and burnout as a result of the risks and stress of their work. Without adequate mental health support for activists, it could be difficult to sustain the human rights movement at a time when threats and risks of activism are increasing. How can funders take the wellbeing of activists into account through their funding? What are good practices to ensure that funders are doing no harm, and what are the options for actively supporting the resilience of activists to continue their work? Join the Human Rights Funders Network and Ariadne for a webinar on 20 September 2019 10:00am EST to learn more about the findings of the research and hear from peer donors about their efforts to integrate an awareness of wellbeing into their work.

Speakers:

  • Adam Brown, Associate Professor of Psychology, New School for Social Research
  • Marianne Mollmann, Director of Regional Programs, Fund for Global Human Rights
  • Magda Adamowicz, Senior Program Specialist, Open Society Foundations

The webinar is co-sponsored by Human Rights Funders Network Ariadne and will be moderated by Julie Broome, Ariadne Director.

Please register here.

Faith Leaders as Human Rights Defenders

October 25, 2017

This week (23 – 27 October 2017) there is an on-line Dialogue by New Tactics Supporting Faith Leaders and Faith-Based Organizations as Human Rights Defenders” with as goal: Mobilizing Allies and Modeling Systems and Structures.

The background to this interesting topic is the converging and diverging principles of secular human rights goals and religious values. On the one hand, there are historical and contemporary instances in which oppressors have used religious doctrines to endorse discrimination and violence against marginalized groups. Around the world, people continue to suffer daily from these acts of hate. Yet, many faith leaders from a range of religions denounce religiously motivated violence and actively work to combat human right abuses around the world. Some of history’s most impactful activists—El Salvador’s Oscar Romero, India’s Mahatma Gandhi, Iran’s Shirin Ebadi, the United States’ Martin Luther King drew upon their personal faith to promote civil rights and peace.
Today, many faith leaders and faith-based organizations have become leaders in human rights activism and humanitarianism, both locally and internationally. In Northern Uganda, the Acholi Religious Leaders Peace Initiative has united faith leaders to advocate for peace and strengthen the peacebuilding process in the wake of the region’s devastating civil war. Rabbis for Human Rights supports human rights in Israel and the Occupied Territories by performing acts of solidarity with Palestinians suffering from the Occupation, organizing interfaith dialogues, and educating their fellow community members on the interconnectedness of Judaism and human rights. Musawah is global human rights movement working to advance women’s rights in Muslim contexts, using Islamic teachings and universal human rights doctrinal frameworks to guarantee equality in the lived realities of men and women. Each of these organizations has incorporated their faith into action-based human rights movements that demonstrate their accountability in practicing what they preach: dignity, justice, and fairness for all humanity.
Faith leaders and organizations can contribute to strengthening human rights around the globe by countering voices of oppressors, mediating conflicts to end or avoid violence, denouncing discrimination, organizing humanitarian assistance, and so much more. Just as faith communities may thrive in environments where each member’s dignity and rights are recognized, the international human rights movement may learn from engaging communities with deeply rooted ethical and spiritual foundations. In March of 2017, the UN Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights launched “Faith for Rights,” an initiative to strengthen the interconnectedness of the world’s religions and human rights. In the subsequent Beirut Declaration, participating faith-based and civil society actors recognized their mutual commitment to “upholding the dignity and the equal worth of all human beings.” Across the world, faith leaders and faith-based organizations can be valuable allies in achieving universal human rights for all.
In this conversation, New Tactics seeks to discuss the role of faith in promoting human rights across the globe and strategies for strengthening partnerships between secular and religious human rights defenders.  The Conversation Leaders are:
habdille's picture
Marie Juul Petersen's picture

Source: Supporting Faith Leaders and Faith-Based Organizations as Human Rights Defenders | New Tactics in Human Rights

Resources used by Human Rights Defenders to create effective strategies are collected by New Tactics in Human Rights

March 29, 2013

Strategic thinking is a discipline used in all types of work. In order to build a house, you need a plan. In order to win votes to get elected for a political position, you need a plan. Human rights work is no exception – in order to make change, you need a plan and hopefully, it’s a good one!. New Tactics in Human Rights wants to build a collection of stratHomeegic-thinking resources and tools for human rights defenders to help in the selection and application of successful tactics. They have been working closely with human rights defenders in the Middle East and North Africa region to share a methodology to apply strategy and tactics to human rights work, and are eager to share with you the tools they have been using.

Humor as weapon in the human rights arsenal

January 14, 2013

From  Monday 14 – Friday 18 January 2013 Tactical Dialogue and New Tactics in Human Rights are organizing again an on-line conversation on Using Humor to Expose the Ridiculous.

All over the world, human rights activists use humour, irony, satire, parody and lampooning to express dissent and challenge the absurdities of institutional power.

They expose the lies, deceptions and sheer absurdities in their speech.

However, this is not without risks, which are particularly high in times of political turmoil.

So how exactly do activists in different parts of the world use humor to take on institutional power? How do they choose their tactics? What are the challenges they face in their work? And how do they overcome them? This online conversation will be an opportunity to exchange experiences, lessons-learned and ideas among practitioners using humor to challenge regimes and societies, and provoke citizens to reevaluate the way they think, and sometimes even push them to join them in their campaigns.

A few years ago, the same organizations hosted a conversation on a topic similar to this month’s conversation. It was called “Tactical that Tickle: Laughing all the way to the win”. Lessons from that exercise are available on-line via:

Using Humor to Expose the Ridiculous | New Tactics in Human Rights.