Posts Tagged ‘Access Now’

‘Access Now’ names Usha Ramanathan a ‘Human Rights Hero’ for her opposition to Aadhaar

June 11, 2019

Jahnavi Sen, writing in the Wire of 10 June 2019, reports Usha Ramanathan, a legal researcher and activist based in Delhi, has been declared a ‘human rights hero’ by international rights group Access Now for her criticism of the Aadhaar programme. Since the scheme was launched in 2009, Ramanathan has been raising the security and privacy risks associated with it, as well as the concerns on linking the programme to welfare schemes. While facilitating Ramanathan’s “tireless” efforts to highlight the issues related to Aadhaar, Access Now has said that it also wants to “recognise the entire community that has protested and litigated against Aadhaar”. In September 2018, the Indian Supreme Court upheld the validity of the Aadhaar law, but placed strict restrictions on its scope. Before the final judgment, the court had passed a number of orders which were conveniently ignored by the administration, Ramanathan and others have pointed out. Ramanathan has written a number of articles on why the programme needs to be rebooted, and the risks it poses to people’s privacy. A number of her articles have been published in The Wire.

The award function will be held in Tunis between June 11 and 14, as a part of RightsCon. The awards will be handed out by Michelle Bachelet, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights.

Since 2014 Access Now issues the anual award “in celebration of…the work of people around the globe to protect human rights in the digital age, naming “heroes” and “villains” who have either protected the principles of freedom online, or worked to undermine them.”

There are a total of five winners this year. Other than Ramanathan, Bahraini activist and digital security consultant Mohammed Al-Maskati, Australian human rights lawyer, broadcaster and writer Lizzie O’Shea, Tanzanian digital security trainer Zaituni Njovu and Venezuelan lawyer, writer and human rights activist Marianne Díaz Hernández have also been designated ‘heroes’.

https://thewire.in/rights/usha-ramanathan-aadhaar-opposition

EU Parliament ‘improves’ proposed Terrorist Content Regulation

April 18, 2019

After my earlier piece about the risks in the draft EU regulation on terrorism content [see: https://humanrightsdefenders.blog/2019/01/31/ngos-express-fear-that-new-eu-terrorist-content-draft-will-make-things-worse-for-human-rights-defenders/], I am happy to report that some NGOs have welcomed the changes now made in the latest version.

On 17 April 2019 eub2 reports that “EU Parliament deletes the worst threats to freedom of expression proposed in the Terrorist Content Regulation”: Read the rest of this entry »

Internet shutdowns to silence opposition – what to do?

January 28, 2019

“African governments use Internet shutdowns to silence opposition more and more —what can people do?” askson EuroNews of

What would you do if your government decided to intentionally shut down your access to the Internet? Millions of people around the world have had to answer this question time and time again over the past few years, as government-mandated Internet blackouts are on the rise. Less than a month into 2019, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon and Zimbabwe have experienced government crackdowns on Internet connections.

From 2016 to 2018, 371 separate cases of Internet shutdowns were documented around the world. More than half of them occurred last year alone, according to international non-profit organisation Access Now.

Authorities have used a number of reasons to justify the blackouts, including public safety, national security and stopping the dissemination of rumors and illegal content. However, advocacy groups investigating governmental tendencies to exert control over the flow of information don’t buy it. They claim it has more to do with silencing opposition movements and protests and trying to limit political instability.

They harm everyone: businesses, emergency services, journalism, human rights defenders, and demonstrators. They don’t help victims or restore order,” Access Now’s website reads.

In the past few weeks, several African governments have turned to partial or complete shutdowns in attempts to control the public discussion.

Sudan doubled down on social media amid widespread anti-government protests, with Access Now and the #KeepItOn coalition calling on network operators to fight back against state pressure — but it wasn’t the only African country to do so.

Zimbabwean authorities were quick to gag social media — including Facebook and Whatsapp — as soon as civil unrest over rising fuel prices spread in Harare and other major cities, and the DRC also ordered a full blackout following recent elections…..

From 2016 to 2018 alone, Africa witnessed 46 Internet shutdowns,…….Chad, Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Somaliland, Algeria, Togo, Cameroon, Gambia, Uganda, Gabon, Algeria, Morocco, Lybia, Tunisia, and Algeria have all cracked down on their citizens’ access to the Internet in the past.

How did citizens react to Internet or social media shutdowns?

People always find a way”, Zimbabwean analyst Alexander Rusero told Euronews. “But it {VPN} doesn’t work for everyone”, Rusero pointed out. “Usually the ones in Harare, at the centre of the country, manage to”.

The analyst was quick to underline the issues behind similar crackdowns…”During the Internet blackout there were a lot of lies and rumors — they spread faster than you would believe. Media relies on social media, and so do critical opinion leaders. Outside those platforms, fake news manifest”.

Jean-Hubert Bondo, a journalist from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, doesn’t believe the problems end here. “Many Congolese families live off their small cybercafés. Also, we are in a country where there are not enough physical libraries. Students and researchers use the Internet to research their work at the university. Young people animate pages on Facebook and WhatsApp”, he told Euronews. “To deprive us of the Internet is to take us back to antiquity”. As for the VPNs Rusero mentioned — the most common ways to avoid Internet censorship worldwide — Bondo said that, during the latest shutdown, they failed to work. “In response to what is being perceived as a violation of human rights, Bondo reported that several Congolese civil society organisations have now lodged a complaint against the main telecommunication companies.

In Uganda, a crackdown on Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, YouTube, and mobile money apps in February 2016 as citizens were heading to the polls sparked a legal case that will be discussed in court in February 2019. “Shutdowns may not silence people, but they do hinder communication”, said Ugandan blogger Ruth Aine Tindyebwa….

https://www.euronews.com/2019/01/26/african-governments-use-internet-shutdowns-to-silence-opposition-more-and-more-what-can-pe

https://www.dailynews.co.zw/articles/2019/01/27/ed-justifies-internet-shutdown

Protecting human rights defenders from hackers and improving digital security

October 31, 2016

Joshua Oliver on 14 October, 2016 interviewed for NY City Lens, Kim Burton of Access Now about the digital security dangers faced by human rights defenders. A recent example is what happened to Ahmed Mansoor [https://thoolen.wordpress.com/2016/08/29/apple-tackles-iphone-one-tap-spyware-flaws-after-mea-laureate-discovers-hacking-attempt/] but there are many other cases. The staff of the Digital Security Helpline offers free, 24/7 technical support and advice on digital security to activists, journalists, and human rights defenders around the world. It is a project of Access Now, an NGO that promotes human rights online. The interview ends with 3 simple practical steps that any person can do to improve their security.

Kim Burton, security education coordinator at Access Now, works on the digital security helpline.

Kim Burton, security education coordinator at Access Now, works on the digital security helpline.

What makes the kind of targeted digital threat that a human rights defender or an activist might experience different from the threats that ordinary users might face?

The goal is different. When you’re targeting the average individual often these campaigns are really large. They’ll be interested in getting a lot of cash. When someone’s trying to compromise a human rights defender or activist or journalist, it’s usually because they want that person’s information. They want that person’s contacts. They want to be able to intimidate that person so they stop doing the work that they’re doing.

What type of things might prompt someone to contact the helpline?

They could receive an unfriendly email that scares them, and so they’ll bring that email to us. With journalists it’ll be more about protecting information that they’re trying to move out of the country, or it can just be protecting their publishing while they’re online. Often when we get contacted it’s for people who have had their accounts actually hacked. Where the account is posting information that the owner did not post, or it’s completely defaced.

Can you describe the difference between the support that’s typically available for someone in a corporate or government environment with a digital security problem as compared to someone in a non-governmental organization working on human rights or activism?

I think one of the major things is just having someone to call. In a corporate environment they have either an IT group or a person or systems administrator. So you already know who to call. In NGOs [non-governmental organizations], often times, there isn’t an IT person at all. There’s not a systems administrator. The tech support is not available. And part of that is funding. Corporate environments are able to spend a lot more money on salaries, so they’re able to pay the tech people a lot more than they would get in the NGO space.

What can be the direct consequences to the people who are targeted by this kind of threat? 

Unfortunately people can die. That’s one of the things that we have to be aware of every day on the helpline. People do get killed for the information that they have out there. The other consequences are: people’s lives can be ruined, people can be imprisoned, people can have to leave countries, their families can be hurt. The stakes are very high.

Can you define what phishing is?

It’s those emails that say something like “You’ve won a million dollars, click here to receive.” Or something that is a little bit more scary, like “This is your co-worker, I need the password to this account.” It can get more targeted. But everyone receives these — this isn’t unique to the people that we work with. It’s just that the people that we work with might have a higher chance of receiving a more targeted phishing campaign.

What are three easy things people can do to improve their own digital security? 

Number one, always install software updates. Updates are often released to address security vulnerabilities; updating is your first line of defense.

Two, use unique, long, and strong passwords. If your password is leaked in one place, and you have used the same password somewhere else, that other account can be compromised as well. Avoid remembering each of these unique passwords with a password manager, like KeePassX or LastPass. Password managers keep your credentials in an encrypted database and assist you in generating unpredictable strings to use as sturdy logins.

Three, use two-factor authentication when available. Instead of only using a password to protect your account, two-factor requires another “factor” to log in. Like a bank that needs your card and PIN to withdraw from an ATM, you’ll need your password and something else (like a SMS text, generated code, or fingerprint) to access your account. All of the major email providers provide multi-factor authentication, as do many other accounts, like Amazon, Twitter and Facebook; look for it in your security settings.

see also: https://thoolen.wordpress.com/tag/digital-security/

Source: Protecting Activists from Hackers – NY City Lens