Posts Tagged ‘human rights record’

Amnesty International India goes into elections with 14 point human rights programme

February 27, 2014

On 27 February 2014 it was reported by TwoCircles.net that Amnesty International India is asking political parties contesting the 2014 parliamentary elections to commit to and adopt as part of their manifestoes 14 key goals to improve India’s human rights record. … India’s political parties need to show their commitment to respect, protect and fulfill fundamental human rights. Amnesty representatives are meeting leaders from various political parties with the following 14 points of the ‘Human Rights Charter’:

  1. Protecting the rights of communities affected by corporate-led projects.
  2. Ending torture, extrajudicial executions and enforced disappearances.
  3. Ending arbitrary detention and reducing excessive under-trial detention.
  4. Protecting the rights of all persons in custody.
  5. Ending the use of the death penalty.
  6. Ensuring justice for marginalized communities who have suffered abuses.
  7. Reforming the criminal justice system to better tackle violent crime.
  8. Tackling all forms of violence against women more effectively.
  9. Holding armed forces accountable for human rights abuses.
  10. Protecting people’s rights to privacy and freedom of expression.
  11. Protecting the rights of migrant workers and domestic workers.
  12. Strengthening human rights institutions and protecting human rights defenders.
  13. Building a culture of respect for human rights through education.
  14. Adopting a more principled approach to human rights abuses around the world.

via Amnesty International puts forward 14 human rights charter for coming election | TwoCircles.net.

Example of open attitude by Mauritius: side event organised by Government itself

October 18, 2013

The Permanent Mission of the Republic of Mauritius to the UN in Geneva does something special: it organises a side event on its own human rights record in preparation of the Universal Periodic Review. Would other countries please follow? 

“The promotion and protection of human rights in Mauritius” on Tuesday 22 October 2013 from 16.00 to 18.00 hours at Palais des Nations Room XXII in Geneva.

Programme

  • Opening Remarks by A. Boolell, Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • Sharing best practices

–       Presentation of the National Action Plan on Human Rights for Mauritius

–       Presentation on the UPR Preparation Process for Mauritius

  • Role of national institutions in the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights, by Mr Brian Glover, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Commission.

 

 

A balanced post on how the US should balance its human rights record

March 23, 2012

Under the title “A Diminished Force for Good” Tom Parker of USA AI posted on 21 March 2012 a piece that – in a frank way – argues that the US should act with regard to its own human rights problems in order to regain international influence. It takes the lead role of the US in getting a resolution on Sri Lanka (successfully) passed in the Human Rights Council in Geneva this week and contrasts it with how the US has dealt with human rights abuses in its own ambit.

As Amnesty’s recent report Locked Away: Sri Lanka’s security detainees makes clear, human rights abuses still continue to this day in Sri Lanka. Instances of arbitrary and illegal detention have been widely reported, as have acts of torture and extrajudicial execution. Tom Parker says “I know from my own personal experience of working with Sri Lankan human rights defenders that the climate of fear in which opponents of the Rajapaksa regime operate is all-pervasive. The situation in Sri Lanka is grave and the intervention of the United Nations is much needed. .However, welcome though the US-sponsored resolution is, it is greatly undermined by the embarrassing gap that exists between US rhetoric and US behavior. Critics have not been slow in pointing this out.”…”The complete failure of the United States to address the deliberate use of torture as an integral part of the War on Terror hugely diminishes its ability to put pressure on other states to adhere to human rights standards that it itself has ignored. And we are all the poorer for it.”

The alacrity with which the US Army has responded to the tragic deaths of sixteen Afghan villagers in Zangabad, Afghanistan, earlier this month demonstrates that accountability is nothing to be afraid of. Indeed it can be a powerful force for good….. The US is one of the [governments that actively promote human rights] but its influence has been greatly diminished over the past decade because of its reluctance to meaningfully address its own, very public, failings in this regard….We need a strong US voice speaking out for human rights in the world, but that can’t happen without real accountability at home.”

for the full text see: A Diminished Force for Good.