Non-cooperation from some States with the UN Human Rights Council is persistent

June 23, 2014

In a recent piece published on LinkedIn on 3 June 2014, I argued that there is not enough attention given to enforcement [https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140603192912-22083774–crime-should-not-pay-in-the-area-of-international-human-rights]. This conviction was fortified by reading the ISHR Monitor of 20 June in which Heather Collister sums up recent cases of persistent non-cooperation by States with the Council’s special procedures and other mechanisms.

The Human Rights Council heard updates from the Special Rapporteurs on Belarus, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and Eritrea, along with the latest update from the Commission of Inquiry into the situation in Syria. In all cases the countries in question have refused access to the mechanism created by the Council to monitor and report on the human rights situation.

In particular, Russia, China, Venezuela, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua, and Cuba made similar comments during the various debates to the effect that simply participating in UPR is already a way of cooperating, even if in fact these countries do not accept or implement the (often already weakly formulated) UPR recommendations that would improve the situation on the ground.

See more at: Human Rights Council: Persistent non-cooperation from some States | ISHR.

One Response to “Non-cooperation from some States with the UN Human Rights Council is persistent”


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